Holloway Archives Launches New Exhibit on Coeducation

“No distinction as to sex in studies, examinations, or the giving of Diplomas.” Thus states the Annual of Milligan College for the 1880-1881 Session, when the Buffalo Male and Female Institute became Milligan College. Being a coeducational college was unusual for the time, but it was not surprising due to the college’s original status as a primary/secondary school as well as the influence and ideals of Josephus Hopwood, the first president of Milligan. A new exhibit in the Welshimer Library and online (in Milligan DigitalRepository) examines Milligan as a coeducational institution during the Hopwood era, from 1881-1917, from the beginning of Josephus Hopwood’s first term as college president to the end of his second term.

Willie Godby Tabor’s Shorthand Class (1897)

“I think we often forget that Milligan was unusual in educating men and women together during its early days,” says Katherine Banks, University Archivist. “I hope that this exhibit shines some light on why that was and what that meant for students at Milligan during those early years.”

Thanks to Milligan’s roots as a school run by the local church, Buffalo Creek Church (now Hopwood Memorial Christian Church), that then developed into the Buffalo Male and Female Institute, the ground was already set for the college to be coeducational – educating men and women side by side instead of separately (or sometimes not at all, in the case of women). Josephus Hopwood also brought a passion for coeducation when he became the college’s first president, in part because of his religious background and his own college experience.

This ad from a 1915 edition of the Milligan paper The Light proudly lists being coeducational as one of the college’s merits.

“We have to remember, however, that educating men and women together didn’t mean they were always together all the time and had a completely equal experience,” Banks says. “The exhibit discusses some of the ways that they practiced equality by today’s standards, but also the ways in which they did not.” Women were subjected to more restrictive rules than the men, and some classes were specifically for women. But there were many classes that had both men and women in them, and even the faculty at Milligan was mixed to some degree. Overall, Milligan was making strides as a coeducational institution.

The exhibit “‘No Distinction’: Coeducation in Milligan’s Early Years, 1881-1917” is available to view in person on the first floor of the Welshimer Library for those currently allowed to visit campus under the Milligan Returns Home plan. The exhibit can also be viewed online with a more extensive discussion of coeducation at Milligan.

“Faces of the First Ladies”: New Archives Exhibit at Welshimer Library

The Holloway Archives at Milligan University has recently installed a new exhibit for Fall 2020 in the Welshimer Library. “Faces of the First Ladies: A Photo Exhibit of Milligan’s First Ladies, 1882-1968” displays over two dozen photos of Milligan’s presidential wives, from Sarah LaRue Hopwood to Dorothy Keister Walker. Included in the exhibit are short descriptions of these women, including how long they served as first ladies and who their husbands — the presidents — were.

Perlea Derthick

“The presidents get a lot of the spotlight in Milligan history, but the ladies have an interesting history too,” says Katherine Banks, University Archivist. “Sarah LaRue Hopwood was just as much a part of Milligan’s founding and early years as Josephus was. Perlea Derthick ran the school while Henry was away, which was often. Dorothy Keister Walker was an ordained minister and evangelist in the 1950s and 1960s.”

Dorothy Keister Walker and Dean Walker

May Day Play, Olive Garrett on far right, circa 1896

While many of the photos in the exhibit are portraits of the women, Banks points out that several of them speak to the women’s involvement in the school as well. “Some of the only photos I could find for the early first ladies were of them with a group of faculty or with students,” Banks says.

Additionally, there are some photos of the women that show their personal side. “One of my favorite photos in this exhibit is of Sarah LaRue Hopwood with a parrot on her shoulder! Typically, you think of photos from the late 1800s and early 1900s as being stiff and unsmiling. But this photo breaks that stereotype and speaks to Sarah’s love of animals.”

Sarah LaRue Hopwood, circa 1898

“We’re in a unique position this fall, with the pandemic, which may limit who will be able to see any archival exhibits,” Banks says. “I thought doing an exhibit that was heavily visual would be helpful for having an online version of the exhibit, so that people viewing the exhibit online wouldn’t feel like they were missing anything.” The exhibit is available for online viewing on Milligan DigitalRepository, Milligan’s online archival repository. Although slightly different in format than the physical exhibit, viewers can still see all the same information and photos that they would see in person. For those able to see the exhibit in person, it is available for viewing on the main floor (first floor) of Welshimer Library in the archival exhibit cases.

 

First Ladies of Milligan, 1882-1968:

  • Sarah Eleanor (LaRue) Hopwood, First Lady 1875-1903, 1915-1917
  • Olive Leola (Hanen) Garrett, First Lady 1903-1908
  • Pearl Katherine (Archer) Kershner, First Lady 1909-1911
  • Aileen (Moore) Utterback, First Lady 1911-1913
  • Allie (McCorkel) McDiarmid, First Lady 1913-1914
  • Elizabeth (Murphy) McKissick, First Lady 1914-1915
  • Perlea Derthick, First Lady 1917-1940
  • Florence Elizabeth (Anthony) Burns, First Lady 1940-1944
  • Geneva Dora (Tarr) Elliott, First Lady 1944-1948
  • Mary Lewis, First Lady 1948-1950
  • Florence (Ley) Walker, First Lady 1950-1960
  • Dorothy (Keister) Walker, First Lady 1962-1968

Own a piece of Milligan Library history!

How do you go about finding a book in the Welshimer or Emmanuel Seminary Library? If you are like most Milligan College or Seminary students or faculty today, the answer is obvious: you fire up your computer, launch your web browser and point it to the Milligan Libraries website, pull down the “Resources” menu, select “Books/Media Catalog” and then select “Milligan & Libraries Worldwide” to launch the online catalog. Search for the title. If we have the book in print or electronic (ebook) format, the record will pop up in your search results. The record will show you where the book can be found (library and call number location), and it even tells you if the book is currently available.

The card catalog

This wasn’t always the case, however. If you can believe it, once upon a time book records were typed on physical 3 x 5 inch cardboard cards (Title, Author/Editor, and Subject cards were created for each book) which were then arranged in wooden cabinets, collectively called the card catalog.

Here is a card that instructed students and faculty on the use of the card catalog.

The Holloway Archives at Milligan College, located in the basement of the Welshimer Library, still has one of the library’s old card catalog cabinets.

The Milligan College Library used a physical card catalog until the first online catalog went into service in the Fall of 1995. As it happens, the library was at the forefront of implementing computer technology on campus. The library implemented its first computerized library management system in 1988. Of course this was before the internet was (commonly) a thing, and the system was not networked. In a Stampede editorial from March 1988, then library director Steven Preston noted that the library system was used to print catalog cards.

In 1992, a collaboration between Milligan College, Emory & Henry College, King College (now King University), and (since closed) Virginia Intermont College resulted in the receipt of a 5-year United States Department of Education Title III grant that would be used to computerize the library catalog and create a barcode checkout system. Also during this time the Milligan College IT Department was installing fiber optic cable to create a campus-wide computer network that would be connected to the internet. Of interest, in an article from the September 30, 1992 issue of the Stampede, Steven Preston mused that “in the future, students and faculty will be able to link into the [library] system from their rooms and offices.” A Stampede article from May 3, 1996 covering Spring Board of Trustees meetings made specific reference to the newly implemented online catalog when it reported “[library] information is now easier to find due to the computerization of the card catalogs.”

What to do with all those card catalog record cards?

The transition from a physical card catalog to a computerized online catalog was a labor intensive process, as all the library’s catalog records needed to be translated into computer readable format. This process was outsourced to a company called Western Library Network (WLN) utilizing our card catalog record cards. The long and the short of this process was that after the records were computerized, boxes and boxes of catalog cards were returned to us to dispose of, or use as we saw fit. Since the old record cards were only printed on a single side, what ended up happening was that they were used around the library as scrap note cards. Ironically, a common use was that students or faculty would search the online catalog for a book and write the book’s call number on an old card catalog record card before heading to the stacks.

The library had so many boxes of these cards that it seemed as though they would last forever. But as it turns out, we recently reduced our backlog to a single box. We started to put the cards out next to the catalog computer as usual. But it then occurred to us that these cards were a part of Milligan Library history — a history we wanted to share with our users. So we’ve put this box at the Circulation Desk of Welshimer Library. Come by and take a card or two as a memento — a piece of Milligan Library history for you to own. But don’t wait too long. When they’re gone, they’re gone.

New Exhibit on the History of Pardee Hall Opens

The Holloway Archives at Milligan College has recently installed a new exhibit on the history of Pardee Hall, called “100 Years of Pardee.” The exhibit celebrates the 100th anniversary of the dedication of Pardee Hall, a dormitory that stood in the central part of campus from 1920 to 1992.

Pardee Hall under construction

While no longer standing, Pardee Hall holds a special place in Milligan history, even 100 years after it was dedicated on October 10, 1919. The building was named for Milligan donors Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Pardee and was completed in 1920. It was built as part of the campus rebuilding and expansion after the administration building burned down in 1918. The dorm typically housed men throughout its lifespan, although there were some brief periods, including in the 1960s, when it housed women. Pardee also served as housing for the men participating in the Navy V-12 program during World War II.

The residents of Pardee, known in the later years as the “Pardee Rowdies,” were notorious for their many pranks and practical jokes. But these students also had a special love for the dorm. It was with sorrow that many of the Rowdies gathered in the summer of 1992 to watch the dorm torn down after it could no longer safely serve the college. Today, the former location of the dorm is a field for campus activities – particularly Frisbee games – and is marked by a brick wall in the nearby parking lot. A new Pardee Hall stands in Milligan Village to carry on the tradition of a beloved hall built one hundred years ago.

“As a second-generation Milligan alumna, I grew up hearing stories about Pardee Hall,” says Katherine Banks, college archivist and curator of the exhibit. “When I saw that 2019 would mark the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the dorm, I knew that it would make a great subject for a Homecoming exhibit.” The exhibit includes photos throughout its life-span, as well as memorabilia, including a “Pardee Rowdy” t-shirt, a brick, and Pardee Hall stationery. “Many alumni have fond memories of life in Pardee. I hope that the exhibit can bring back some of the nostalgia as well as tell people not as familiar with Pardee about its part in Milligan history,” says Banks.

The Pardee Band

The exhibit, “100 Years of Pardee,” can be found on the first floor of the Welshimer Library and online. If you come by to see the exhibit during Homecoming, be sure to pick up a souvenir photo of Pardee!

Exhibit opens celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Milligan College’s Humanities Program

“What does it mean to be human?” The Milligan College Humanities program is a unique four-semester course sequence that combines art, literature, philosophy, theology, and more to help students grapple with this key question. Almost every undergraduate student who passes through Milligan participates in this course sequence, Milligan’s alternative to taking separate history, literature, and art classes to satisfy general education requirements. The 2018-2019 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the program, which over the intervening years has become a central part of the Milligan experience. As part of the celebration, The Holloway Archives at Milligan College has opened an exhibit on the history of the Humanities program in the lobby of the Gregory Center.

Jack Knowles, humanities professor, teaches a class outside (undated photo from the 1970s)

The exhibit is divided into four sections. The first is a timeline of the development of the program, from 1965 when a restudy of the general education requirements began, and 1968 when the program began its first year, to 2018 when the Master of Arts in Humanities began its first year. The second section walks through the founders of the program, with photos of beloved long-time humanities faculty and others. Alumni and current students will recognize many faces in these archival photos. The third section covers the Humanities European Study Tour, a faculty-led tour of Europe that began in 1971 and continues to the present. Several yearbook spreads document the development of this popular study abroad option, including years when the group traveled around Europe in a van and camped. The last section includes articles about the Humanities program from The Stampede, including an amusing cartoon of what one’s brain looks like after studying humanities!

Cartoon by Doug Hartley, The Stampede, April 7, 1995, p. 4

“I hope students and alumni alike come by Gregory to see the exhibit,” says Katherine Banks, College Archivist and curator of the exhibit. “I think they will all find something interesting in it, whether it’s a photo of a favorite professor or seeing what the Humanities experience was like for students thirty or forty years ago.” The physical exhibit will be displayed in the Gregory Center lobby throughout the month of April. A digital version of the exhibit is available for viewing on MCStor, Milligan College’s digital repository.